(Source: bratsquad)

newyorker:

A cartoon by Liana Finck, in this week’s issue.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Liana Finck, in this week’s issue.

djtrimal:

*watches Netflix

*looks at clock

image

*watches Netflix

nom nom nom #applepicking #linvillaorchards #whoeveneatsgoldendelicious @mel_danko @caitmquinn @sgadkari92 @magpie124

nom nom nom #applepicking #linvillaorchards #whoeveneatsgoldendelicious @mel_danko @caitmquinn @sgadkari92 @magpie124

But one particular document—from the early 1900s, she estimates—caught her eye. “The wording was so unusual,” says Dennehy, who now works for the National Council on Crime & Delinquency. “It was for a prisoner who had died in custody at the old state prison, and next to ‘cause of death’, it read ‘judicial homicide.’”

It’s a telling turn of phrase. Sometime during the 20th century—historical sources disagree as to the exact year—the term “capital punishment” entered American legal parlance, and with it a sanitized rebranding of state-sanctioned killings. Dennehy had never heard the term “judicial homicide” used before encountering it in the vault, nor—during her 30-year career in corrections that followed—did she hear it used again. Taken separately, the words “capital” and “punishment” are both qualifiers for the condemned, but “judicial homicide” points to someone else entirely. It’s the guard standing at the door to the death chamber, the strap-down team member holding the prisoner’s ankles, and the physician inserting the needle. It’s the people who walk into the death chamber and walk back out, and sure, their task is judicial. But just because we call it “punishment” now, does it affect their psyches any less than when we called it “homicide”?

home is where the heart is #hcinnyc #nuzzles

home is where the heart is #hcinnyc #nuzzles

(Source: 30rockasaurus)

bookoisseur:

juliagazdag:

I want to bottle Maggie Smith’s facial expressions and keep them forever. Yes, I know that’s basically what filming something does, shut up. 

(Source: catleecious)

mapsontheweb:

NOAA’s weather map of ground temperature.

mapsontheweb:

NOAA’s weather map of ground temperature.